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A comparative analysis of colour–emotion associations in 16–88‐year‐old adults from 31 countries

2023 , Domicele Jonauskaite , Déborah Epicoco , Abdulrahman S. Al‐rasheed , John Jamir Benzon R. Aruta , Victoria Bogushevskaya , Sanne G. Brederoo , Corona Cabrera, Alba Violeta , Sergejs Fomins , Alena Gizdic , Yulia A. Griber , Jelena Havelka , Marco Hirnstein , George John , Daniela S. Jopp , Bodil Karlsson , Nikos Konstantinou , Éric Laurent , Lynn Marquardt , Mefoh, Philip , Daniel Oberfeld , Marietta Papadatou‐Pastou , Corinna M. Perchtold‐Stefan , Giulia F. M. Spagnulo , Aygun Sultanova , Takumi Tanaka , Ma. Criselda Tengco‐Pacquing , Mari Uusküla , Grażyna Wąsowicz , Christine Mohr

AbstractAs people age, they tend to spend more time indoors, and the colours in their surroundings may significantly impact their mood and overall well‐being. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence to provide informed guidance on colour choices, irrespective of age group. To work towards informed choices, we investigated whether the associations between colours and emotions observed in younger individuals also apply to older adults. We recruited 7393 participants, aged between 16 and 88 years and coming from 31 countries. Each participant associated 12 colour terms with 20 emotion concepts and rated the intensity of each associated emotion. Different age groups exhibited highly similar patterns of colour–emotion associations (average similarity coefficient of .97), with subtle yet meaningful age‐related differences. Adolescents associated the greatest number but the least positively biased emotions with colours. Older participants associated a smaller number but more intense and more positive emotions with all colour terms, displaying a positivity effect. Age also predicted arousal and power biases, varying by colour. Findings suggest parallels in colour–emotion associations between younger and older adults, with subtle but significant age‐related variations. Future studies should next assess whether colour–emotion associations reflect what people actually feel when exposed to colour.

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Universal Patterns in Color-Emotion Associations Are Further Shaped by Linguistic and Geographic Proximity

2020 , Domicele Jonauskaite , Ahmad Abu-Akel , Nele Dael , Daniel Oberfeld , Ahmed M. Abdel-Khalek , Abdulrahman S. Al-Rasheed , Jean-Philippe Antonietti , Victoria Bogushevskaya , Amer Chamseddine , Eka Chkonia , Corona, Violeta , Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero , Yulia A. Griber , Gina Grimshaw , Aya Ahmed Hasan , Jelena Havelka , Marco Hirnstein , Bodil S. A. Karlsson , Eric Laurent , Marjaana Lindeman , Lynn Marquardt , Philip , Marietta Papadatou-Pastou , Alicia Pérez-Albéniz , Niloufar Pouyan , Maya Roinishvili , Lyudmyla Romanyuk , Alejandro Salgado Montejo , Yann Schrag , Aygun Sultanova , Mari Uusküla , Suvi Vainio , Grażyna Wąsowicz , Sunčica Zdravković , Meng Zhang , Christine Mohr

Many of us “see red,” “feel blue,” or “turn green with envy.” Are such color-emotion associations fundamental to our shared cognitive architecture, or are they cultural creations learned through our languages and traditions? To answer these questions, we tested emotional associations of colors in 4,598 participants from 30 nations speaking 22 native languages. Participants associated 20 emotion concepts with 12 color terms. Pattern-similarity analyses revealed universal color-emotion associations (average similarity coefficient r = .88). However, local differences were also apparent. A machine-learning algorithm revealed that nation predicted color-emotion associations above and beyond those observed universally. Similarity was greater when nations were linguistically or geographically close. This study highlights robust universal color-emotion associations, further modulated by linguistic and geographic factors. These results pose further theoretical and empirical questions about the affective properties of color and may inform practice in applied domains, such as well-being and design.

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The sun is no fun without rain: Physical environments affect how we feel about yellow across 55 countries

2019 , Domicele Jonauskaite , Ahmed M. Abdel-Khalek , Ahmad Abu-Akel , Abdulrahman Saud Al-Rasheed , Jean-Philippe Antonietti , Árni Gunnar Ásgeirsson , Kokou Amenyona Atitsogbe , Marodégueba Barma , Daniel Barratt , Victoria Bogushevskaya , Maliha Khadidja Bouayed Meziane , Amer Chamseddine , Thammanard Charernboom , Eka Chkonia , Teofil Ciobanu , Corona, Violeta , Allison Creed , Nele Dael , Hassan Daouk , Nevena Dimitrova , Cornelis B. Doorenbos , Sergejs Fomins , Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero , Augusta Gaspar , Alena Gizdic , Yulia A. Griber , Gina M. Grimshaw , Aya Ahmed Hasan , Jelena Havelka , Marco Hirnstein , Bodil S.A. Karlsson , Stephen Katembu , Jejoong Kim , Nikos Konstantinou , Eric Laurent , Marjaana Lindeman , Banu Manav , Lynn Marquardt , Mefoh, Philip , Aleksandra Mroczko-Wąsowicz , Phillip Mutandwa , Georgette Ngabolo , Daniel Oberfeld , Marietta Papadatou-Pastou , Corinna M. Perchtold , Alicia Pérez-Albéniz , Niloufar Pouyan , Tanjir Rashid Soron , Maya Roinishvili , Lyudmyla Romanyuk , Alejandro Salgado Montejo , Aygun Sultanova , Ramiro Tau , Mari Uusküla , Suvi Vainio , Veronica Vargas-Soto , Eliz Volkan , Grażyna Wąsowicz , Sunčica Zdravković , Meng Zhang , Christine Mohr

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Sensory expectations from aesthetic perceptions of coffee beverages presented in different mugs

2020 , Corona, Violeta , Ivette Vargas de la Cruz , Lujan-Moreno, Gustavo , Jose Albors-Garrigos , Purificación García Segovia , Rojas, Omar

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Neuromarketing in the Digital Age: The Direct Relation between Facial Expressions and Website Design

2022 , Guillermo González-Mena , Del-Valle-Soto, Carolina , Corona, Violeta , Rodríguez, Jafet

User experience (UX) is key in the immediate and future relationship between the client and business. Achieving a satisfying UX can only be achieved by understanding the wishes and user needs. The following study is carried out as an improvement tool for a Mexican coffee company. The objective is to achieve greater efficiency, attraction, and engagement on the part of the user. The main question is whether the new dynamic website design can directly increase the valence of user emotions compared to the static website design. To answer this question, 39 participants were exposed to the two different web page designs and elicited the following emotions using eye tracking and facial expression analysis (FEA) techniques: joy, anger, surprise, fear, contempt, disgust, sadness, neutral, positive, and negative. Through a Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the results showed a significant increase for the new dynamic design in the following emotions; joy, anger, surprise, disgust, fear and neutral. Thus, five of the seven basic emotions had a significant change that could lead to greater attraction and commitment on the part of the user and also influence, either consciously or unconsciously, their decision when interacting with the company.